Hecate to Build Unique 10,000MW Offshore Wind Farm which will transport Electricity to the UK via Submarine HV Cables

Dubbed the ‘Hecate Atlanctic Wind Power’ project, the company will spend over €25 billion to construct wind energy ‘pods’ of 10,000MW spread across the North Atlantic Sea which will transmit electricity to the UK via high-voltage cables

A view of the Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm in the UK, Credit: Phil Hollman, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY 2.0

A view of the Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm in the UK, Credit: Phil Hollman, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY 2.0

Hecate Independent Power, a clean energy and storage company based in America has launched a unique wind power project that will be located in the North Atlantic sea but will provide electricity directly to the UK by specially designed submarine power transmission cables.

The wind farms will be spread across southern and eastern coasts of Iceland in 10 ‘pods’ of 1,000MW each. Each pod will transmit electricity to the UK via long-length, high-capacity, high-voltage direct current transmission cables that will be situated under the sea. A complex has been specially designed in a British port at a cost of over €225 million to manufacture the cables. Known as the Hecate Atlantic Wind Power project, the company has estimated the total cost of the entire endeavour to be almost €25 billion.

Every wind energy ‘pod’ will be owned by the National Grid Corporation, the UK’s electricity system operator. This arrangement means that the Hecate Atlantic Wind Power project is Britain’s first ‘captive’ wind farm which is situated in territorial waters other than its own. Hecate has submitted 4 connection applications with National Grid for an initial capacity of 4,000MW. The proposal involves supplying electricity to the National Grid’s 400kV electricity transmission system.

Hecate Atlantic Wind Power project has been designed in such a way that it will generate electricity from wind during times when twin farms in British territory are at low capacity. This is because the ‘pods’ are situated in meteorologically different areas than the wind turbines in the British North Sea and the Irish Sea.

By the beginning of 2025, Hecate is expecting that the wind project will generate an initial capacity of 2,000MW. Even though the pods are spread across the Icelandic coast of the North Atlantic Sea, the project will not connect to the Icelandic electricity grid. However, the project’s location means that it will generate almost 500 jobs in Iceland during the initial phase of 2,000MW generation.